Lapford and Nymet Rowland

Lapford and Nymet Rowland parishes are only a couple of miles apart.


For many years the two villages churches shared clergymen.


Both parishes were neglected in the nineteenth century by absent rectors with debts and criminal convictions.


LAPFORD is a parish and village on the river Yeo, and on the road from Crediton to Chulmleigh, with a station on the North Devon branch of the London and South Western railway, and is 5 miles south-east from Chulmleigh, 9 north-west from Crediton,

The church of St. Thomas a Becket is a building of stone, partly in the Perpendicular style, consisting of chancel with aisle, nave, north aisle, south porch and an embattled western tower, restored in 1882 and containing 6 bells:

The soil of Lapford is skillett and clay; the subsoil is the same. The west of the parish, containing some dun land, is remarkably fertile; the east is moorland and of inferior soil. The chief crops are wheat, barley and oats. The area is 3,568 acres of land and 13 of water; rateable value, £3,313; the population in 1901 was 511.

 

NYMET ROWLAND is a parish on the rivers Taw and Yeo, near their confluence, and 1 mile west from the Lapford station of the North Devon branch of the London and South Western railway. The church of St. Bartholomew is a building of stone in the Early English style, consisting of chancel and nave, south porch and an embattled western tower containing one bell: the chancel was restored in 1871. The soil is loam, and the subsoil is shale. The chief crops are wheat, barley and oats. The area is 601 acres; rateable value, £649; the population in 1891 was 92.

Kelly's Directory of Devon, written: 1902